Cut glass ‘Acorn’ Lantern with gilded Arts and Crafts mount

Cut glass ‘Acorn’ Lantern with gilded Arts and Crafts mount

Cut glass ‘Acorn’ Lantern with gilded Arts and Crafts mount

4359

Cut glass ‘Acorn’ Lantern with gilded Arts and Crafts mount:
the lantern cut with diamond and star-burst cutting by Osler of Birmingham; with gilded brass mount of boldly curving struts; suspended on silk flex with centre boss, up to gently curving circular plate. Circa 1900 and restored.
Height of lantern and mount only: 8¾”- 22cm.

Height:19"-48.0cm
Width:5"-12.5cm

cut glass

Often now referred to as 'crystal', the glass was blown and shaped, then passed to a specialist cutter, who would polish and cut patterns to enhance its brilliance.

gilded, gilt

A very thin layer of gold applied to brass or bronze.

Arts and Crafts

The Arts and Crafts movement, based on the writings of John Ruskin and William Morris, was more a way of thinking and making than a style. It flourished between 1880 and 1920 and was a reaction against mass-produced factory goods. The revival of handicrafts produced metalwork which emphasised the toolmarks and how it was constructed. Favourite motifs included hearts, fish, flowers, fruit, birds, galleons. W. A. S. Benson designed light-fittings for Morris & Co., made at his workshop in Hammersmith, and also had his own shop in Bond Street.

Osler & Co. (F & C)

Founded in Birmingham, England, in 1807, F & C Osler produced some of the most magnificent and imaginative items ever to come from a glass manufacturer. Thomas Osler, his sons, Follett and Clarkson, and after 1831, his nephew Abraham, were known for their exquisitely cut glass, often combined with fine gilded-metal mounts and framework, produced by their own craftsmen. From about 1840, they had established good contacts with the Middle East and had a gallery in Calcutta, India. Osler made an extravagant cut glass fountain for the centre of The Great Exhibition in 1851. They continued making chandeliers of the highest quality until well into the 20th century. In 1924, they took over the well-known lighting manufacturer Faraday Ltd. and went on producing light fittings until the 1970s.

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